5 discussions due in 24 hours

5 DISCUSSIONS DUE IN 24 HOURS..

  

Discussion – Reader Response 

Instructions:

  • In your post summarize what you      have read and learned in the textbooks and online lecture materials this      week.
  • In other modules, you will be      continuing the chapters and sections listed under ‘Read’ below in the      Module 1 overview. Note your progress as part of your reader response this      week.
  • Include a discussion point or      question in your post about something you did not understand.
  • Include a discussion point or      question in your post about something you thought about as you read.
  • Include a discussion point or      question in your post about something you want your peers to think about.

Discussion – It’s Classified

A successful post meets rubric criteria (Content, Organization, Style/Language, and Sentence Structure/Grammar) and follows the discussion prompt. A successful reply to classmates answers their questions, provides additional insight into the topics they have discussed, generates additional questions, or engages in meaningful and substantive dialogue. Completing this forum should enable you to plan a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay and write a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay. (MO 1,2)

Instructions:

Have you ever clicked on a video, post, etc. with a title that was something along the lines of:

 

  • ’10 People You’ll Room With In      College’
  • ‘5 Cashiers You’ve Probably Met?’

These are classifying people from a particular walk of life into distinct categories. Although people are usually more complicated than these limited, defined categories, it seems to be part of our internet culture to make/watch these lists. There are even similarly themed quizzes to determine into which category you will be sorted. There are lists with this same method but using items rather than people. There are other lists starting with numbers, simply naming specific events/items which fit into one defined category or standard, along the lines of ‘Five of the Worst Waterslide Failures in History! #EpicFail.’ In the above examples, each of the ten college roommates/five cashiers would not be actual people but caricature/stereotype categories of people.

 

  • Create a title like these titles, a      number followed by the situation-specific category/categories.
  • Define the category/categories.
  • Be brief in your category      definitions.
  • You can be as serious or as silly as      you want with this.

Discussion – It’s a Slang Thang

  

A successful post meets rubric criteria (Content, Organization, Style/Language, and Sentence Structure/Grammar) and follows the discussion prompt. A successful reply to classmates answers their questions, provides additional insight into the topics they have discussed, generates additional questions, or engages in meaningful and substantive dialogue. Completing this forum should enable you to plan a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay and write a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay. (MO 1,2)

Instructions:

  • Name a current or modern slang      or colloquial word or phrase, particularly one you yourself are quite      familiar with or use often.
  • Alternatively, name a word or      phrase which is less well-known to the broader culture but quite familiar      to you and those within your family, social group, or work environment.
  • Compose a coherent paragraph      defining this term for your instructor and peers.
  • You may write this as a one to      three paragraph narrative explaining the origin and meaning of the term in      your own life if you wish.

Discussion – Birds of a Feather

  

A successful post meets rubric criteria (Content, Organization, Style/Language, and Sentence Structure/Grammar) and follows the discussion prompt. A successful reply to classmates answers their questions, provides additional insight into the topics they have discussed, generates additional questions, or engages in meaningful and substantive dialogue. Completing this forum should enable you to plan a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay and write a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay. (MO 1,2)

Instructions:

  • Think of a person you know/your      favorite celebrity/your hero.
  • In a short (no more than a few      paragraphs) post, compare/contrast yourself and this person.

Discussion – Apples to Aardvarks

  

A successful post meets rubric criteria (Content, Organization, Style/Language, and Sentence Structure/Grammar) and follows the discussion prompt. A successful reply to classmates answers their questions, provides additional insight into the topics they have discussed, generates additional questions, or engages in meaningful and substantive dialogue. Completing this forum should enable you to plan a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay and write a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay. (MO 1,2)

Instructions:

Shrek compared ogres to onions because they both have layers (although Donkey pointed out that they both also are not particularly pleasant olfactory experiences).

 

  • Draw an analogy between two      seemingly unlike items.

Module 4: Overview

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null Module Introduction

  

This module covers the rhetorical modes of compare/contrast, analogy, definition, and division/classification. At the end of this module, you will have an essay due for which you will choose one or more of these modes. This module will help you learn to be able to break assignments into component pieces, identify the component pieces, establish appropriate deadlines for completion of the task, and compose a written analysis that follows the appropriate rules of grammar and composition. (CLO 1,2,3,4)

Click the video below to watch the introduction from your faculty.

This module does not include a video introduction.

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null Module Objectives 

  

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  1. plan a compare/contrast,      analogy, definition, or division/classification essay. (CLO 1,2,3)
  2. write a compare/contrast,      analogy, definition, or division/classification essay. (CLO 1,2,3,4)
  3. revise a compare/contrast,      analogy, definition, or division/classification essay. (CLO 1,2,3,4) 

READ

DUE: Early in the week

Read the following early in the week to help you respond to the discussion questions and to complete your assignment(s).

Required Textbook Readings

  1. Continuing Required Textbook      Readings from Module 1  – (MO 1,2,3)
  2. The Norton Reader, p. 574-579, “Rhetorical Modes Index” [skim      & bookmark this] – (MO 1,2)
  3. The Norton Reader, Choose one essay listed under Comparing and      Contrasting’  in the RM index. – (MO 1,2)
  4. The Norton Reader, Choose one essay listed under ‘Classifying and      Dividing’  in the RM index. – (MO 1,2)
  5. The Norton Reader, Choose one essay listed under ‘Defining’  in the      RM index. – (MO 1,2)

  

null  READ AND WATCH ONLINE

DUE: Early in the week

Online Lecture Material:  Read and listen to the online lecture material on the following topics.

  1. The Compare/Contrast Essay      PowerPoint – (MO 1,2)
  2. Writing a Compare/Contrast      Essay – (MO 1,2)
  3. Organizing a Compare/Contrast      Essay–Block Method (Subject by Subject) – (MO 1,2)
  4. Organizing a Compare/Contrast      Essay–Point By Point – (MO 1,2)
  5. Organizing a Compare/Contrast      Essay–Comparisons followed by contrasts (or the reverse) – (MO      1,2)
  6. Analogy, Definition, Division      & Classification – (MO 1,2)
  7. Definition Essay – (MO      1,2)
  8. Definition Essay Information      – (MO 1,2)
  9. Sample Essays – (MO      1,2,3)
  10. Lecture materials also include      an additional link provided as a resource/reference – (MO      1,2)

     

Module Summary   

This module discussed and utilized the rhetorical modes and genres of compare and contrast, analogy, definition, and division and classification as you completed a variety of activities. You should now able to plan a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay, write a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay, and revise a compare/contrast, analogy, definition, or division/classification essay. (CLO 1,2,3,4) Ideally, you are now more prepared for the coursework ahead. After reviewing and completing all the content in this module, proceed to the next module where you will be learning about the rhetorical modes of argumentation and persuasion as well as writing research-based essays. You will also write your fourth essay.

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